Wednesday Jan 09, 201311:19 AM GMT
California child poverty rate up
Wed Jan 9, 2013 11:18AM
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Children in line at food bank in California.

 

More than 20% of California children live in poverty, while the childhood poverty rates among Latinos and blacks are higher at about 33%, according to a report released Monday by the Center for the Next Generation.

 

The authors of the report, “Prosperity Threatened: Perspectives on Childhood Poverty in California,” noted that childhood poverty became more pronounced as a result of the economic crisis that started in 2008.

 

a separate report by the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health found that that the number of California children decreased by about 200,000 between 2000 and 2010 and is on track to fall by another 100,000 by 2020.

 

Declining migration and falling birthrates have led to a drop in the number of children in California just as baby boomers reach retirement, creating an economic and demographic challenge for the nation's most populous state, according to the Wall Street Journal.

 

In 1970, six years after the end of the baby boom, children made up more than one-third of California's population. By 2030, they will account for just one-fifth, according to projections by lead author Dowell Myers, a USC demographer.

 

California's demographic shift mirrors that of many Northeast and Midwest states, including New York, Massachusetts, Illinois and Michigan, where the percentage of children fell even more sharply from 2000 to 2010.

 

FACTS & FIGURES

 

As California diversifies, it will face serious economic struggles if it fails to pay attention to widespread childhood poverty, according to a report released on January 7 by the Center for the Next Generation.

 

As countries such as China and India ramp up investment in education, U.S. funding has stagnated. The Next America

 

Studies have suggested that youngsters who live in poverty are less likely to successfully climb the economic ladder as adults. National Journal

 

Children who grow up poor are more likely to have low earnings as adults; in turn, that lower workforce productivity results in direct loss of good and services to the overall economy, according to a Center for American Progress report.

 

AHT/ARA

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