Wednesday Jul 11, 201202:41 AM GMT
Scientists sonify the Higgs Boson-like particle into habanera rhythm
The photo is the sonification of the data received from the newly discovered Higgs Boson-like particle into a Cuban dance rhythm.
The photo is the sonification of the data received from the newly discovered Higgs Boson-like particle into a Cuban dance rhythm. An undated handout graphic distributed on July 4, 2012 by the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva shows a representation of traces of a proton-proton collision.
The photo is the sonification of the data received from the newly discovered Higgs Boson-like particle into a Cuban dance rhythm.
Wed Jul 11, 2012 2:39AM
Share | Email | Print

Sonification worked by attaching a musical note to each data. So, when you hear the resulting melody you really are hearing the data.”

Domenico Vicinanza, product manager at DANTE (Delivery of Advanced Network Technology to Europe

Researchers say they have "sonified" the data from the Atlas experiment, making it possible to "hear" the newly discovered Higgs Boson-like particle, the atom’s most elusive building block.


The result of the experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Switzerland is a melody which resembles the dotted rhythm of the habanera, a name used outside of Cuba for the Cuban contradanza which is a genre of a tango-like popular dance music of the 19th century, Discovery News reported on Wednesday.

Such "sonification" efforts have previously made sounds and musical scores based on data extracted from different sources ranging from the Sun to volcanoes.

On Wednesday, July 4, scientists at the world's largest nuclear research laboratory on the outskirts of Geneva, CERN, announced that they had found a Higgs-like particle, dubbed the "God particle,” after analyzing results from the LHC.


Scientists at CERN used the multibillion-dollar particle accelerator to emit two beams of protons in opposite directions around the 27-km (17-mile) looped pipe built under the Swiss-French border before smashing them into each other.

Researchers detected a "bump" in their data corresponding to a particle weighing in at 126 gigaelectronvolts (GeV), consistent with the Higgs Boson, which is believed to give mass to all other particles.

"As soon as the announcement was made, we begun working on the sonification of the experimental data," Domenico Vicinanza, product manager at DANTE (Delivery of Advanced Network Technology to Europe), located in Cambridge, UK, said.

"Sonification worked by attaching a musical note to each data. So, when you hear the resulting melody you really are hearing the data," he added.

"In this way any regularity in the scientific data can be naturally mapped to the melody: if the data are periodic (they are marked by a repeated cycle) the sonification will be a music melody which will have the same periodicity and regularity," Vicinanza said.

The new subatomic particle, a basic building block of the universe which confers mass to matter, appears to be the boson imagined half a century ago by theoretical physicist Peter Higgs -- hence called the Higgs boson.


Because of its significant role in the making of the material universe, the boson is sometimes called the "God particle" as its existence is fundamental to the creation of the universe, and its discovery involved thousands of scientists from all over the world.

Scientists see the confirmation of Higgs theory as accelerating investigations into the still unexplained "dark matter" they believe pervades the universe and into the possibility of a fourth or more dimensions, or of parallel universes.


It may help in resolving contradictions between their model of how the world works at the subatomic level as shown by Quantum mechanics and Einstein's theory of gravity.

AS/HGL
Comments
Add Comment Click Here
Latest From Sci-Tech
  • Today
  • Last Week
  • Last Month
  • Today
  • Last Week
  • Last Month
Follow Us
© Copyright 2012 Press TV. All rights reserved. | About PressTV | Contact Us | Frequencies | Privacy Policy