Tuesday Jun 28, 201103:19 PM GMT
Iran offers Pakistan $100mn more in aid
Mon Sep 13, 2010 1:26AM
Share | Email | Print
Flood victims queue for aid in Sanawan, Punjab province, Pakistan.
Iranian First Vice President Mohammad-Reza Rahimi says Iran has allocated $100 million worth of humanitarian aid for the flood-hit people of Pakistan.


Rahimi made the remarks late Sunday night after Leader of the Islamic Revolution Ayatollah Seyyed Ali Khamenei on Friday said the measures taken to aid the people of Pakistan were insufficient, urging all Muslims to help their brothers in Pakistan.

Ayatollah Khamenei described the flood disaster in Pakistan as the "most urgent" issue of the Muslim world.

The Leader expressed deep sorrow over the catastrophic floods in Pakistan and the lingering humanitarian crisis it has brought to the country.

On Saturday, the head of Iran's Red Crescent Society (IRCS) announced that the society is ready to set up at least ten more relief camps to shelter people in the flood-stricken areas of Pakistan.

“Since the first days of flooding in Pakistan, IRCS has dispatched aid for the flood-stricken people of Pakistan in 13 aid packages and has set up three relief camps in Sindh, Punjab and Balochistan Provinces,” Faqih said.

Faqih said the IRCS has sent almost 1,000 tons of aid in the form of food and medicine as well as medical workers and doctors to Pakistan.

Earlier on Sunday, Supervisor of Imam Khomeini Relief Foundation Hossein Anvari declared the coming Thursday as the 'Solidarity Day' with the flood-stricken people of Pakistan.

Anvari said that on September 16 Iranians can extend their humanitarian aid, in cash or goods, to the Pakistani nation.

Iran was among the first countries to dispatch relief supplies to Pakistan and has announced its readiness to help reconstruct Pakistan's flood-ravaged regions.

The latest official figures show the flooding, which is the worst-ever natural disaster to hit Pakistan, has affected some 21 million people and killed over 1,760 others.

Relief agencies warn that aid is too slow to arrive for millions without clean water, food and homes in the flood-hit regions of Pakistan.

The international community has pleaded for a boost in global relief efforts to help some 800,000 Pakistanis stranded in areas only accessible by air.

AS/MGH
Related Stories:
Comments
Add Comment Click Here
Latest From Society
  • Today
  • Last Week
  • Last Month
  • Today
  • Last Week
  • Last Month
Follow Us
© Copyright 2011 Press TV. All rights reserved. | About PressTV | Contact Us | Frequencies | Privacy Policy