Sat Jul 1, 2017 01:47AM
International travelers arrive at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) on June 29, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by AFP)
International travelers arrive at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) on June 29, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by AFP)

American Muslim leaders say that President Donald Trump's travel ban would eventually be proven unlawful.

The statement by Leaders of the Islamic Society of North America (ISNA) came on Friday, one day after the US travel ban on six predominantly Muslim countries took effect.

The 90-day ban, which targets citizens from six predominantly Muslim countries, namely Iran, Syria, Yemen, Libya, Somalia and Sudan, came into force after the US Supreme Court allowed it to be enforced pending a full hearing in October.

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Leaders of the ISNA, which is said to be the largest Muslim advocacy group on the continent, condemned the ban as they gathered for a weekend convention in Chicago.

"His (Trump’s) statements and his rhetoric have caused a great amount of harm to the American Muslim community," said Azhar Azeez, president of the ISNA.

"This country has always been an inclusive nation, a tolerant nation," Azeez said, adding, "We, as Americans, have an obligation to make sure we uphold all these things."

Convention attendee Arishaa Khan said, "This ban has been tumultuous."

"We had a lot of people come to visit in the mosque... to show support. And it was very nice," said Muhammad Abdellatif, another attendee from Houston.

Members of Catholic, Lutheran and Jewish faiths were also set to attend the three-day convention.

The condemnation by the ISNA came a few hours after the American Civil Liberties Union also described the measure as extremely restrictive and arbitrary.

The group said the ban has been designed to “disparage and condemn Muslims.”

Trump’s initial ban and his second version, blocked by lower courts, provoked huge protests and created chaos at international airports.

The US president insists his ban is necessary for national security, but critics have called the ban discriminatory against Muslims.