Sat Apr 8, 2017 8:34AM
Men walk amid the rubble of a house destroyed by a Saudi airstrike on the outskirts of Sana’a, Yemen, February 2, 2017. (Photo by AP)
Men walk amid the rubble of a house destroyed by a Saudi airstrike on the outskirts of Sana’a, Yemen, February 2, 2017. (Photo by AP)

At least five civilians have been killed in Saudi airstrikes on residential areas in the Yemeni provinces of Hajjah and Ta’izz.

According to Yemen’s al-Masirah television, Saudi warplanes launched two air raids on residential buildings in Hajjah’s Hayran district on Friday night.

At least three people were killed and five others injured in the aerial attacks.

The Saudi jets also pounded Maqbanah district in the southwestern province of Ta’izz on Friday, leaving a teen and a child dead, while another boy was wounded.

On April 3, the Saudi jets dropped the internationally-banned cluster bombs in Dhubab district of the same province, killing five people, including three women.

The Saudi war machine has already used cluster bombs across Yemen on multiple occasions despite the inherently indiscriminate nature of cluster munitions.

Various rights groups, including Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch, have on many occasions reported and criticized the use of cluster bombs by Riyadh’s military in Yemen.

Doctors treat a man who was injured in Saudi airstrikes in the Red Sea port city of Hudaydah, Yemen, October 30, 2016. (Photo by AP)

Yemenis respond

In retaliation for the non-stop air raids, the Yemeni army’s sniper unit killed three Saudi soldiers on the kingdom’s territory on Friday.

The Yemeni snipers shot dead a soldier in Saudi Arabia’s southwestern province of Jizan.

The snipers also killed a Saudi soldier in al-Muthanna military base, east of al-Rabou’a, in the kingdom’s province of Asir. Another soldier was shot dead near Alab border crossing in the same province.

The Yemeni army and popular committees also launched artillery and rocket attacks at several military positions in Jizan and Najran in southwestern Saudi Arabia.

The Saudi aggression, which seeks to restore Yemen’s ex-government to power, has killed over 12,000 Yemenis, according to the latest tallies.

Over the past two years, Yemen’s Houthi Ansarullah movement has been running state affairs and defending the nation against the Saudi aggression.