Sat Mar 4, 2017 11:14AM
An Iraqi soldier inspects a makeshift factory used by Daesh to manufacture weapons in the village of Imam al-Hamzah, south of Mosul, on October 31, 2016. (Photo by AFP)
An Iraqi soldier inspects a makeshift factory used by Daesh to manufacture weapons in the village of Imam al-Hamzah, south of Mosul, on October 31, 2016. (Photo by AFP)
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Iraqi sources have announced that Takfiri Daesh terrorists have used internationally-banned chlorine gas against civilians in eastern Mosul.

The commander of the Iraqi rapid response forces, Captain Sa'adon Khaled al-Ramadani, said on Thursday that the extremists lobbed a barrage of Katyusha rockets containing chlorine gas on al-Maliyah, Nabi Yunus and al-Faisaliyah neighborhoods of Mosul.

A number of people were reportedly transferred to medical centers and hospitals after suffering severe poisoning with the toxic gas.

Michael Springmann, an author and attorney from Washington, believes it is necessary to find out who is behind supplying terrorists with such prohibited lethal weapons.

Chemical elements “is something that is not [what] you can make it in your bathtub at home” or find its elements in the kitchen, Springmann told Press TV on Saturday.

“You need a factory to make it (chemical weapons) and you need to transport it,” he added.

It is important to know, “where the agents came from, who is supplying them, who has the know-how and who has the equipment,” he asked.

Smoke rises as Iraqi forces advance through Mosul's Jawasaq neighborhood on February 27, 2017, during an offensive to retake the area from Daesh terrorists. (Photo by AFP)

The Daesh terrorists “have been firing mortars with chemical agent,” which seems to be “mustard gas,” the analyst said.

It is not clear where the terrorists get the banned weapons from; however, the United States and its regional allies like Saudi Arabia and Qatar have been overtly supplying militant groups in Syria with arms and ammunition.

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Springmann called for preventing the foreign-sponsored militants from wreaking havoc in the region.

“The way to stop terrorism, way to stop ISIL (Daesh) and their permutations and combinations is to stop giving them money, stop giving them weapons and stop giving them training,” he underscored.

“All of these people stem from the Mujahedin that the Americans recruited, trained and supported in the war against Afghanistan and it’s continued through the wars in the Balkans, in Iraq, in Libya and in Syria,” the analyst pointed out.

If state sponsors of terrorism stop their support for the militants, that would give an end to them, he concluded.