Sun Jan 22, 2017 9:47PM
Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev gives a speech during a congress of the ruling United Russia party in Moscow on January 22, 2017. (Photo by AFP)
Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev gives a speech during a congress of the ruling United Russia party in Moscow on January 22, 2017. (Photo by AFP)

Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev says that despite the results of elections in other countries, the sanctions against Moscow are here to stay.

“It’s time to discard the illusions that any sanctions imposed on our country would be lifted. Obviously, they are there to stay for a long time. And don’t lay your hopes on someone else’s elections,” said Medvedev while addressing the United Russia party on Sunday.

Several Russian and foreign political experts and analysts have suggested that with the election of US President Donald Trump, Washington and its allies may move towards lifting the sanctions against Russia on the basis of statements made by Trump over working closer with Moscow.

US President Donald Trump speaks at CIA Headquarters in Langley, Virginia, on January 21, 2017. (Photo by AFP)

Trump became the 45th US president on Friday after taking the oath of office on the steps of the US Capitol during a momentous event marred by massive protests against his divisive rhetoric. 

In response to a sanction regime imposed by the EU on Russia over the crisis in Ukraine, Moscow barred the import of EU-produced foodstuffs.          

Medvedev also noted that some sanctions being implemented by the EU were in fact beneficial to sectors in Russia’s economy, especially agriculture, where domestic producers are profiting from the situation.

“We will support them, because we will be feeding ourselves in any case,” he added.

Economic sanctions against Moscow were originally introduced in March 2014, after Ukraine’s strategic Black Sea peninsula of Crimea joined Russia following a referendum.

Since then, the European Union, the US and some other Western countries have imposed several rounds of sanctions against Russia over accusations that Moscow has been involved in the deadly crisis in Ukraine, which has killed nearly 10,000 people to date. The Kremlin, however, has strongly rejected the accusations.