Tue Jul 26, 2016 08:34AM
US Secretary of State John Kerry (L) speaks with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov during a meeting in Vientiane, Laos, July 26, 2016. (Photo by AFP)
US Secretary of State John Kerry (L) speaks with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov during a meeting in Vientiane, Laos, July 26, 2016. (Photo by AFP)

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov has rejected allegations by the US Democratic National Convention (DNC) that Moscow was behind a recent hack of its computer systems.

Attending a regional security forum in Laos’ capital, Vientiane, Lavrov was asked if Russia was responsible for the cyber attack on the computer network of the DNC.

“Well, I don’t want to use four letter words,” Lavrov replied, apparently implying that an answer to the question would require to be vulgar.

On Friday, the WikiLeaks website released about 20,000 emails from the DNC, which showed that party leaders had purportedly sought to undermine the presidential campaign of Senator Bernie Sanders.

The revelation prompted DNC chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz to announce her resignation on Sunday.

The campaign of Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton alleged that Russia had released the emails to influence the November presidential election in the US.

US Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at a Democratic Party organizing event in Charlotte, North Carolina, July 25, 2016. (Photo by AFP)

Democrats have also brought the White House under pressure to publicly name Moscow as the perpetrator, according to the CNN.

State Department spokesman John Kirby, however, declined to draw any conclusions “about what happened and what the motivation was behind it.” He said the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is conducting an investigation.

The agency announced Monday it was “working to determine the nature and scope of the matter.”

The US has repeatedly pointed the finger at other nations for the hack of various American companies and institutions. Last year, it accused the governments of North Korea of having hacked the Sony incorporation’s computer systems.

Washington also accused the Chinese government and military of conducting cyber attacks, including efforts to steal information from federal US agencies.

Both Beijing and Pyongyang denied the allegations.