Tue Jun 28, 2016 12:52AM
British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond (L) and US Secretary of State John Kerry (R) hold a joint press conference after their meeting at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) in central London on June 27, 2016.
British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond (L) and US Secretary of State John Kerry (R) hold a joint press conference after their meeting at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) in central London on June 27, 2016.
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A political commentator says that the United States is upset about the result of Thursday’s referendum in the UK as it would endanger Washington’s achievement of its goals in the Europe.

Daniel Patrick Welch made the comments about remarks by US Secretary of State John Kerry who said Monday that the United States would maintain a special relationship with the United Kingdom in the wake of the British exit from the European Union.

Kerry, who is on a tour of Brussels and London, made the remarks on Monday, days after British citizens voted in the historic referendum to leave the EU, a bloc that the UK joined more than 40 years ago.

Kerry called on EU members not to "lose their head" or be "revengeful" after Britain's decision to leave the 28-nation bloc.

"The US is upset about the Brexit vote,” Welch said. “In some ways, the break-up of the EU would hamper US entire achievements of its goals in Europe.”

In the June 23 referendum, about 52 percent of British voters opted to leave the EU, while roughly 48 percent of the people voted to stay in the union. More than 17.4 million Britons said the country should leave the bloc, as just over 16.14 million others favored remaining in the EU.

The EU is "a horrific imperialist superstructure financial oppression of unelected bureaucrats from Brussels as the opponents have constantly been hammering at and there is a popular upsurge against that," Welch said. 

Membership of the EU has been a controversial issue in the UK since the country joined the then European Economic Community in 1973.

Those in favor of a British withdrawal from the EU argue that outside the bloc, London would be better positioned to conduct its own trade negotiations, better able to control immigration and free from what they believe to be excessive EU regulations and bureaucracy.

Those in favor of remaining in the bloc argue that leaving it would risk the UK's prosperity, diminish its influence over world affairs, and result in trade barriers between the UK and the EU.