Sun Feb 21, 2016 7:15PM
A Yemeni holds models of rockets during a rally in the capital Sana'a on June 14, 2015, over the military aggression by Saudi Arabia against the impoverished country. (AFP Photo)
A Yemeni holds models of rockets during a rally in the capital Sana'a on June 14, 2015, over the military aggression by Saudi Arabia against the impoverished country. (AFP Photo)

Yemeni army forces, backed by fighters from allied Popular Committees, have gained control of a military base in Saudi Arabia’s Najran Province.

Yemen's Arabic-language al-Masirah news website reported that as part of the retaliatory campaign for relentless Saudi military attacks against the impoverished nation, Yemeni forces on Sunday managed to seize control of Nahuqeh military base.

The report said the Yemeni forces' attack on the base started with rocket fire and continued with a ground offensive, forcing the Saudi troops to flee.

Yemeni forces destroyed one military vehicle and an observation tower in this attack. They also seized a huge cache of munitions in the operation.

Al-Masirah also reported a separate retaliatory rocket attack by Yemeni forces on Sunday in the city of Rabu'eh in Asir Province, destroying two Saudi military vehicles and an ammunition depot.

This AFP file picture shows Saudi jet fighters

Meanwhile, Saudi warplanes bombarded Qafr region in the northwestern Saddah Province six times on Sunday, killing 30 people, including women and children, according to al-Masirah. 

Al-Masirah added that Yemeni authorities expect the death toll from these deadly bombings to increase.

Yemen's official Saba Net news agency reported that six Yemenis had been killed in a Saudi bombing attack in Bani Zabia region in Sana'a Province. The six dead were reportedly civilians riding in a car.  

Yemen has been under military attacks by Saudi Arabia since late March last year. The Saudi military strikes were launched in a failed effort to undermine the popular Houthi Ansarullah movement and bring the former fugitive president back to power.

More than 8,300 people, among them 2,236 children, have been killed and 16,015 others injured since the start of the attacks. The strikes have also taken a heavy toll on the impoverished country’s facilities and infrastructure, destroying many hospitals, schools, and factories.