Mon Feb 8, 2016 2:23AM
A Yemeni boy carries jerrycans to fill them with water from a public tap amid an acute shortage of water supply to houses in the country's third-largest city of Ta'izz on September 3, 2015. (AFP)
A Yemeni boy carries jerrycans to fill them with water from a public tap amid an acute shortage of water supply to houses in the country's third-largest city of Ta'izz on September 3, 2015. (AFP)

Saudi warplanes have carried out fresh airstrikes across the war-ravaged Yemen, inflicting damage and destruction on a dam and reservoir in the Arabian Peninsula country.

Saudi Arabia's fighter jets totally destroyed a reservoir in al-Nahdin district in the Yemeni capital Sana'a on Sunday evening, Yemen's Arabic-language Saba news agency reported.

According to the report, the reservoir, which supplied water to at least 30,000 people in the densely populated area, could store up to 5,000 cubic meters of water and had cost Yemenis $4 million.

Since the beginning of the Saudi aggression on Yemen, the reservoir had been targeted by warplanes some 20 times and sustained partial damage but on Sunday it was completely destroyed.

Saudi jets also bombarded a hospital in the province and seriously wounded a physician and a nurse. The airstrike also inflicted damage to the building and some medical devices.

Meanwhile, Saudi war machine conducted three airstrikes on a dam in the Sirwah district in the central Ma’rib Province and caused heavy damage to its structure. They also carried out attacks on some areas in the western province of Hudaydah.

Yemeni rescuers search for victims under the rubble of the police headquarters in the capital Sana’a after the building was struck overnight by Saudi warplanes on January 18, 2016. (AFP)

Yemen has been under airstrikes by Saudi Arabia since March 26 last year. The Saudi strikes have been meant to undermine the Houthi Ansarullah movement and bring fugitive former president, Abd Rabbuh Mansur Hadi, back to power.

Some 8,280 people, among them 2,236 children, have reportedly been killed and over 16,000 others injured. The strikes have also taken a heavy toll on the impoverished country’s infrastructure.